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ACM Fellows Inducted

Forty-six men and women are recognized as 2011 ACM Fellows.
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The ACM Fellows Program was established by Council in 1993 to recognize and honor outstanding members of the Association for their achievements in computer science and information technology and for their significant contributions to ACM’s mission. ACM Fellows serve as distinguished colleagues to whom the Association and its members look for guidance and leadership as the world of information technology evolves.

The ACM Council endorsed the establishment of a Fellows Program and provided guidance to the ACM Fellows Committee, taking the view that the program represents a concrete benefit to which any ACM member might aspire, and provides an important source of role models for existing and prospective ACM Members. The program is managed by the ACM Fellows Committee as part of the general ACM Awards program. For details on Fellows nominations, see p. 20.

ACM has recognized 46 of its members for their contributions to computing that have provided fundamental knowledge to the computing field and generated multiple technology advances. These 46 new inductees bring the total number of ACM Fellows to 763. ACM will formally recognize the 2011 Fellows at its annual Awards Banquet on June 16, 2012, in San Francisco, CA.

"These women and men, who are some of the leading thinkers and practitioners in computer science and engineering, are changing how the world lives and works," said ACM President Alain Chesnais. "They have mastered the tools of computing and computer science to address the many significant challenges that confront populations across the globe. These international luminaries are responsible for solutions that are transforming our society for the better—in health care, communications, cybersecurity, robotics, commerce, industry, and entertainment."

ACM Fellows

Serge Abiteboul
INRIA Saclay

Divyakant Agrawal
University of California, Santa Barbara

Ronald M. Baecker
University of Toronto

Thomas J. Ball
Microsoft Research

Guy Blelloch
Carnegie Mellon University

Carl Ebeling
University of Washington

David Eppstein
University of California, Irvine

Geoffrey C. Fox
Indiana University

George W. Furnas
University of Michigan

David K. Gifford
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Ramesh Govindan
University of Southern California

Baining Guo
Microsoft Research

David Heckerman
Microsoft Research

Gerard J. Holzmann
ASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Hugues Hoppe
Microsoft Research

Christian S. Jensen
Aarhus University

Howard J. Karloff
AT&T Labs – Research

Stephen W. Keckler
NVIDIA Corporation/The University of Texas at Austin

Peter B. Key
Microsoft Research

Scott Kirkpatrick
The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Robert E. Kraut
Carnegie Mellon University

Susan Landau
Harvard University

Ming C. Lin
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Peter S. Magnusson
Google Inc.

Dahlia Malkhi
Microsoft Research

Keith Marzullo
National Science Foundation/University of California, San Diego

Satoshi Matsuoka
Tokyo Institute of Technology

Nelson Max
University of California, Davis

Joseph S.B. Mitchell
Stony Brook University

Shubu Mukherjee
Cavium, Inc.

Beng Chin Ooi
National University of Singapore

Zehra Meral Özsoyo─člu
Case Western Reserve University

Janos Pach
École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne/Renyi Institute/Courant Institute at NYU

Linda Petzold
University of California, Santa Barbara

Martha E. Pollack
University of Michigan

Dan Roth
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

John W. Sanguinetti
Forte Design Systems

Margo Seltzer
Harvard University/Oracle Corporation

Amit Singhal
Google Inc.

Diane L. Souvaine
Tufts University

Divesh Srivastava
AT&T Labs-Research

Dan Suciu
University of Washington

Dean M. Tullsen
University of California, San Diego

Amin Vahdat
University of California, San Diego/Google Inc.

David J. Wetherall
University of Washington

Frank Kenneth Zadeck
L.J. Gonzer Associates/IBM Research (Consultant)

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