Sign In

Communications of the ACM

BLOG@CACM

Enjoying Reading Research


Geeky Ventures Founder Greg Linden

Research papers take a long time to read.  They are dense, narrowly focused, often seem abstract and detached from practical issues, and occasionally require much knowledge of prior work to grasp.

Given all that work, why bother?  After all, as many of my colleagues in industry say, due to the many assumptions about the quality of the data, needs of the users, performance of the algorithms, or size of the data, academic research often is unusable to them as is.

What I find most valuable about research work is that someone smart has spent a long time thinking about a particular problem.  Someone has spent much effort describing a problem, why it is important, what has been tried in the past, and what should be tried. 

The authors are working to advance the state of the art, but the solution often is less valuable than the journey.  For those that are trying to solve similar problems, it is the discussion of the paths taken and not taken that illuminates the road.

If you also believe this, then the way you read papers might change.  Years ago, I used to turn first to the implementation and experimental results, then push the paper away if I found the evaluation lacking. 

Nowadays, I turn first to the introduction, related work, conclusion, and future work.  I seek to understand the problem, why it is important, what has been tried, and what still needs to be tried.  I try to see why the authors chose to spend part of their lives pursuing solutions to this task and what insights they gained.  I think about how I would solve the problem myself.  And only then do I turn to their solution.

Read this way, it is much easier to bask yourself in the flow of academic publications, letting the thoughts and insights wash over you.  The papers become an easy joy to read, like having a conversation over coffee with the authors.  It becomes what research should be, the sharing of ideas.


 

No entries found

Comment on this article

Signed comments submitted to this site are moderated and will appear if they are relevant to the topic and not abusive. Your comment will appear with your username if published. View our policy on comments

(Please sign in or create an ACM Web Account to access this feature.)

Create an Account

Log in to Submit a Signed Comment

Sign In »

Sign In

Signed comments submitted to this site are moderated and will appear if they are relevant to the topic and not abusive. Your comment will appear with your username if published. View our policy on comments
Forgot Password?

Create a Web Account

An email verification has been sent to youremail@email.com
ACM veriŞes that you are the owner of the email address you've provided by sending you a veriŞcation message. The email message will contain a link that you must click to validate this account.
NEXT STEP: CHECK YOUR EMAIL
You must click the link within the message in order to complete the process of creating your account. You may click on the link embedded in the message, or copy the link and paste it into your browser.