Sign In

Communications of the ACM

News

Preserving the Internet


storage awaiting use

Additional storage awaiting use by the Internet Archive.

Credit: Jason Scott / Textfiles

There was a time when an interested party could find five White House press releases online detailing the number of countries participating in the "Coalition of the Willing" in support of the 2003 invasion of Iraq. That list drew controversy, however, because when the war did not go so well, countries like Togo and Costa Rica objected to having their names associated with it. Consequently, the data was manipulated, says Kaylev Leetaru, who co-authored the report "Airbrushing History, American Style."

Today, two of those five documents are unchanged, two have been deleted, and one is accessible but has been edited from its original form, according to Leetaru. "There was a lot of manipulation, and what came out of that was the White House was altering press releases on a regular basis," he says. "It came out that they didn't view these as government documents, but rather propaganda material, so there was no reason to mark that a change was made."


Comments


James Thomas Moon

The author didn't mention the sleakest, hottest archiving service around; archive.is (formerly known as archive.today).
Simple, straightforward, technically-oriented, fast. It easily beats all other archiving services.


Displaying 1 comment

Log in to Read the Full Article

Sign In

Sign in using your ACM Web Account username and password to access premium content if you are an ACM member, Communications subscriber or Digital Library subscriber.

Need Access?

Please select one of the options below for access to premium content and features.

Create a Web Account

If you are already an ACM member, Communications subscriber, or Digital Library subscriber, please set up a web account to access premium content on this site.

Join the ACM

Become a member to take full advantage of ACM's outstanding computing information resources, networking opportunities, and other benefits.
  

Subscribe to Communications of the ACM Magazine

Get full access to 50+ years of CACM content and receive the print version of the magazine monthly.

Purchase the Article

Non-members can purchase this article or a copy of the magazine in which it appears.