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Research and Advances

Automatic abstracting and indexing—survey and recommendations

In preparation for the widespread use of automatic scanners which will read documents and transmit their contents to other machines for analysis, this report presents a new concept in automatic analysis: the relative-frequency approach to measuring the significance of words, word groups, and sentences. The relative-frequency approach is discussed in detail, as is its application to problems of automatic indexing and automatic abstracting. Included in the report is a summary of automatic analysis studies published as of the date of writing. Conclusions are drawn that point toward more sophisticated mathematical and linguistic techniques for the solution of problems of automatic analysis.
Research and Advances

On finding minimum routes in a network with turn penalties

In some highway engineering work it is necessary to find a route between two points in a city's street and freeway network such that a function of time and distance is minimized. Such a route is called a “best” route, and finding such a route is not a difficult task. The Moore Algorithm1 accomplishes this quite nicely, and using that algorithm and a procedure developed by Hoffman and Pavley2 (programmed by them for the IBM 650) it is even possible to find the “Nth best path.”
Research and Advances

Statistical programs at the University of North Carolina

The Research Computation Center at the University of North Carolina has access to a UNIVAC 1105 general purpose digital computer for use in connection with data processing problems, theoretical studies, and computer research. With respect to data processing problems, three major statistical programs have been written: General Contingency Table Analysis for Questionnaire Data Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) Multiple Regression and Correlation Some of the concepts and ideas in these programs are new and may be of interest to other computation centers. Hence they are described below. The programs were written in the Remington Rand UNICODE language. Thus it would not be difficult to translate them into any other algebraic language, such as ALGOL, FORTRAN, or IT.

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