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'it Will Step in on My Day Off'


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Electronic Arts Senior Vice President Nanea Reeves,

EA's Nanea Reeves

Teradata

In this interview, Electronic Arts senior vice-president online Nanea Reeves shares some of her predictions about the future. Reeves says that video games will have a major influence on hardware and software use by businesses by improving the speed, visual appeal, and interactivity in business applications. Executives will develop and improve their leadership skills by playing games, which force players to make quick decisions. Reeves says there is a lot of crossover between the technology used in games and in high-end financial modeling.

In the public sector, video-game hardware and software will increasingly be used to simulate battlefield scenarios, and more educational software will be used in schools. As technology improves, people will spend more time in virtual worlds, with businesses offering virtual-world services to increase traffic. The processing capabilities of individual devices may go down, according to Reeves, as a growing number of applications will use servers in a remote location for heavy processing. The end devices will be used just to receive the results.

Reeves predicts that someday people may rent artificial intelligence online when they are too busy performing a task to avoid losing progress in a game or to keep projects moving when taking a day off from work. Beyond 2050, Reeves believes that nanotechnology will make video games less video-based and more tactile and immersive, with players feeling the effects of what happens to their virtual-world avatar.

From Financial Times Digital Business
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Abstracts Copyright © 2009 Information Inc., Bethesda, Maryland, USA


 

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