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Communications of the ACM

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The news archive provides access to past news stories from Communications of the ACM and other sources by date.

August 2013


From ACM Careers

35 Innovators Under 35

For our 13th annual celebration of people who are driving the next generation of technological breakthroughs, we're presenting the stories in a new way.


From ACM News

Quantum Paradox Seen in Diamond

Quantum Paradox Seen in Diamond

A quantum effect named after an ancient Greek puzzle has been observed in diamond, paving the way for the use of diamond crystals in quantum computer chips.


From ACM News

A Quantum Leap for the Government in Mining Twitter Feeds

A Quantum Leap for the Government in Mining Twitter Feeds

Last August, around fifty government employees and private contractors gathered at a Defense Department development laboratory in Crystal City, Virginia.


From ACM Opinion

Life After Siri: Nuance's ­phill Climb To Being Your Digital Assistant

Life After Siri: Nuance's ­phill Climb To Being Your Digital Assistant

In the gleaming Silicon Valley branch office of speech-recognition firm Nuance Communications, a small room has been made to look like a homey den.


From ACM TechNews

Printed Graphene Transistors Promise a Flexible Electronic Future

Printed Graphene Transistors Promise a Flexible Electronic Future

Flexible electronic circuits could one day utilize graphene radio-frequency electronics with sufficient speed to generate, receive, and process telecommunication signals. 


From ACM TechNews

Sdsc Launches 'sherlock' to Solve Complex National Challenges

Sdsc Launches 'sherlock' to Solve Complex National Challenges

The San Diego Supercomputer Center is offering Sherlock technology to provide healthcare and government IT services to U.S. government agencies and universities. 


From ACM TechNews

Computer Can Read Letters Directly From the Brain

Computer Can Read Letters Directly From the Brain

A mathematical model has allowed scientists to analyze magnetic resonance imaging scans of the human brain and reconstruct thoughts more accurately than ever before. 


From ACM TechNews

Purdue Researchers Working on Missile-Defense Software

Purdue Researchers Working on Missile-Defense Software

Researchers are developing software to help explore what-if scenarios involving future missile advances in adversarial nations and U.S. defensive capabilities. 


From ACM Careers

Carmakers Look to Video Games For New Routes to Market

Carmakers Look to Video Games For New Routes to Market

The spoiler popped up automatically when the speedometer of the new Audi RS7 Sportback moved past 130 kilometers an hour on Charles Bridge in central Prague, creating just enough downforce to ensure the tires gripped the road…


From ACM News

Preparing a Parallel Programming Workforce

Preparing a Parallel Programming Workforce

As many parallel programmers are aging and retiring, the skill set is increasingly in demand.


From ACM News

NASA Spacecraft Reactivated to Hunt for Asteroids

NASA Spacecraft Reactivated to Hunt for Asteroids

A NASA spacecraft that discovered and characterized tens of thousands of asteroids throughout the solar system before being placed in hibernation will return to service for three more years starting in September, assisting the…


From ACM News

Profile: Juan Wachs

Profile: Juan Wachs

Surgeons could use his hand-gesture system to control robots.


From ACM News

Apple Patents 3d Gesture ­i For Ios Based on Proximity Sensor Input

Apple Patents 3d Gesture ­i For Ios Based on Proximity Sensor Input

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office on Tuesday published an Apple patent for a method of generating and manipulating a 3D object on a computing device, with the process controlled by special gestures made above a touchscreen's…


From ACM News

How Pay-Per-Gaze Advertising Could Work With Google Glass

How Pay-Per-Gaze Advertising Could Work With Google Glass

Google wants to see what you see. And then, of course, make money from those images.


From ACM Opinion

Google Maps Trained ­S to Follow Directions. Now Its Former Developer Wants ­S to Explore.

Google Maps Trained ­S to Follow Directions. Now Its Former Developer Wants ­S to Explore.

It's not evident from the way his hair flops casually down and across, nor from his equally relaxed demeanor, but John Hanke is one of Google's most important idea men.


From ACM Opinion

­dacity Ceo Says Mooc 'magic Formula' Emerging

­dacity Ceo Says Mooc 'magic Formula' Emerging

After weathering a round of negative publicity, Udacity CEO Sebastian Thrun believes vindication is at hand.


From ACM TechNews

Facial Scanning Is Making Gains in Surveillance

Facial Scanning Is Making Gains in Surveillance

The U.S. government's development of a facial recognition surveillance system to identify individuals in crowds is moving ahead. 


From ACM TechNews

10 Hottest It Jobs: Developers, Developers, Developers

10 Hottest It Jobs: Developers, Developers, Developers

Software developers are overall the most desirable information technology (IT) hires companies are seeking, with mobile developers especially sought-after.


From ACM TechNews

U.s. Schools Need More STEM Training, Better Broadband

U.s. Schools Need More STEM Training, Better Broadband

U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan recently reaffirmed the Obama administration's call for faster broadband connections in schools.


From ACM TechNews

Competition: Computer Science Teams Determine the Perfect Baby Name

Competition: Computer Science Teams Determine the Perfect Baby Name

Computer scientists are applying knowledge engineering methods to the task of helping parents-to-be choose the right name for their child.


From ACM TechNews

A Personalized Robot Companion for Older People

A Personalized Robot Companion for Older People

A customizable robot companion to assist elderly people could become available to consumers within two to three years. 


From ACM TechNews

How Footprint Recognition Software May Help Zoology

How Footprint Recognition Software May Help Zoology

WildTrack has developed image-processing software that the detects physical  characteristics of animal footprints that are hard for an untrained eye to recognize. 


From ACM News

How to Save the Troubled Graphene Transistor

How to Save the Troubled Graphene Transistor

The writing is on the wall for the silicon chip.


From ACM News

Hard to Crack: The Government's Encryption Conundrum

Hard to Crack: The Government's Encryption Conundrum

Imagine that you want to tell someone a secret.


From ACM News

When You Can't Tell Web Suffixes Without a Scorecard

When You Can't Tell Web Suffixes Without a Scorecard

On the Web, there's no place like .home.


From ACM TechNews

Intel Proposes New Standard to Light Up Data Transfers

Intel Proposes New Standard to Light Up Data Transfers

Intel's proposed new optical interconnect, MXC, could be a key step in standardizing optical technology and bringing it to servers faster.


From ACM TechNews

A Cost-Effective Solution to Monitoring and Diagnosing Sleeping Disorders

A Cost-Effective Solution to Monitoring and Diagnosing Sleeping Disorders

A new software instantly identifies sleep anomalies by comparing the user's movements to their normal sleeping and waking patterns. 


From ACM TechNews

Nrel Releases Free, Open-Source Energy Analysis Tool

Nrel Releases Free, Open-Source Energy Analysis Tool

Energy DataBus is a new open source app for tracking, storing, and analyzing energy-related data for optimizing energy use and spotting leaks. 


From ACM News

Nsa's Surveillance Program Could Dig Deep

Nsa's Surveillance Program Could Dig Deep

The U.S. National Security Agency has shrouded its collection of Americans’ personal information in secrecy, which makes it difficult to judge whether that data is helping to combat terrorism.


From ACM Careers

Master's Degree Is New Frontier of Study Online

Master's Degree Is New Frontier of Study Online

Next January, the Georgia Institute of Technology plans to offer a master’s degree in computer science through massive open online courses for a fraction of the on-campus cost, a first for an elite institution.