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The news archive provides access to past news stories from Communications of the ACM and other sources by date.

August 2013


From ACM TechNews

Moore's Law Dead by 2022, Expert Says

Moore's Law Dead by 2022, Expert Says

Moore's Law could come to an end as soon as 2020 at the seven-nanometer node. 


From ACM News

How Surveillance Changes Behavior: A Restaurant Workers Case Study

How Surveillance Changes Behavior: A Restaurant Workers Case Study

Surveillance is certainly much in the news lately. Most notably, of course, there is the continuing outcry over the National Security Agency’s call-tracking program, disclosed in the documents leaked by Edward Snowden.


From ACM News

NASA's Plan to Put a Landsail Rover on Venus

NASA's Plan to Put a Landsail Rover on Venus

Venus is like a reclusive celebrity that gets the public's attention every couple of years, though in the planet's case it's more like every century.


From ACM News

Wearable Robots Are No Longer Science Fiction

Wearable Robots Are No Longer Science Fiction

Exoskeletons will address military, medical, commercial applications.


From ACM News

Why Video Games May Be Good For You

Why Video Games May Be Good For You

Games have long been accused of making players violent, but evidence has been building over the years that they can have positive effects.


From ACM News

How a Look at Your Gmail Reveals the Power of Metadata

How a Look at Your Gmail Reveals the Power of Metadata

Sometimes you have to give up a little privacy in order to find out how much—or how little—privacy you really have.


From ACM TechNews

Google+ Posts Getting Language Translation Services

Google+ Posts Getting Language Translation Services

The Google+ translation feature will enable desktop users to rapidly receive basic translations when other users make posts in languages other than their own. 


From ACM TechNews

Cost-Saving Computer Chips Get Smaller Than Ever

Cost-Saving Computer Chips Get Smaller Than Ever

The European Union is funding a project that seeks to improve the reliability of terascale computing by improving chip design. 


From ACM TechNews

NIST Study Advances Use of Iris Images as a Long-Term Form of Identification

NIST Study Advances Use of Iris Images as a Long-Term Form of Identification

Biometric researchers studying iris stability have determined that no consistent change occurs in the distinguishing texture of irises for at least a decade. 


From ACM News

Productivity Tools For Cybercrime

Productivity Tools For Cybercrime

Stealing 10 million dollars a few hundred dollars at a time used to be too labor-intensive to be a great business.


From ACM News

Wormhole Is Best Bet For Time Machine, Astrophysicist Says

Wormhole Is Best Bet For Time Machine, Astrophysicist Says

The concept of a time machine typically conjures up images of an implausible plot device used in a few too many science-fiction storylines.


From ACM News

How Snowden Did It

How Snowden Did It

When Edward Snowden stole the crown jewels of the National Security Agency, he didn't need to use any sophisticated devices or software or go around any computer firewall.


From ACM TechNews

Twitter 'joke Bots' Shame Human Sense of Humor

Twitter 'joke Bots' Shame Human Sense of Humor

Two Twitter bots generate phrases that are funny by virtue of not being particularly funny, to poke fun at human tweeters' own attempts at humor. 


From ACM TechNews

New Technology Protects Against Password Theft and Phishing Attacks

New Technology Protects Against Password Theft and Phishing Attacks

Scientists say they can protect Internet users from phishing attacks with a new system called Uni-IDM. 


From ACM TechNews

Kean Computer Science Students in ­nion Travel 'beyond the Grave'

Kean Computer Science Students in ­nion Travel 'beyond the Grave'

A new smartphone app provides access to information on grave markers in the First Presbyterian Church cemetery in Elizabeth, N.J. 


From ACM TechNews

As Tennis Stats Proliferate, Software Tries to Make Sense of It All

As Tennis Stats Proliferate, Software Tries to Make Sense of It All

SlamTracker software sifts through 20 years of data to predict how tennis players could perform under various circumstances. 


From ACM TechNews

Can an AI Get Into the University of Tokyo?

Can an AI Get Into the University of Tokyo?

Researchers are attempting to create an artificial intelligence (AI) program capable of passing school entrance exams. 


From ACM TechNews

The Walls Have Ears: Princeton Researchers Develop Walls That Can Listen, and Talk

The Walls Have Ears: Princeton Researchers Develop Walls That Can Listen, and Talk

Princeton University researchers have successfully incorporated ultrathin radios on plastic sheets, which can be applied to walls and other structures. 


From ACM TechNews

Researchers Granted Patent For System That Fuses Human and Computer Intelligence

Researchers Granted Patent For System That Fuses Human and Computer Intelligence

The creators of a system that integrates human and computer intelligence to support decision-making in crisis situations have been awarded a U.S. patent. 


From ACM News

The Pentagon as Silicon Valley's Incubator

The Pentagon as Silicon Valley's Incubator

In the ranks of technology incubator programs, there is AngelPad here in San Francisco and Y Combinator about 40 miles south in Mountain View. And then there is the Pentagon.


From ACM News

NASA's Spitzer Telescope Celebrates 10 Years in Space

NASA's Spitzer Telescope Celebrates 10 Years in Space

Ten years after a Delta II rocket launched NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, lighting up the night sky over Cape Canaveral, Fla., the fourth of the agency's four Great Observatories continues to illuminate the dark side of the…


From ACM News

In Markets' Tuned-­p Machinery, Stubborn Ghosts Remain

In Markets' Tuned-­p Machinery, Stubborn Ghosts Remain

A generation ago, when the stock market crashed on Oct. 19, 1987, the Nasdaq stock market appeared to have done much better than the New York Stock Exchange.


From ACM TechNews

Why Can't My Computer ­nderstand Me?

Why Can't My Computer ­nderstand Me?

University of Toronto computer scientist Hector Levesque recently presented a paper highlighting the flaws in artificial intelligence. 


From ACM TechNews

Quadcopter Piloted By a Smartphone

Quadcopter Piloted By a Smartphone

Researchers have built a cost-efficient quadcopter that operates completely autonomously, using a smartphone to provide visual data and a control center. 


From ACM TechNews

Nsa Gathered Thousands of Americans' Emails Before Court Ordered It to Revise its Tactics

Nsa Gathered Thousands of Americans' Emails Before Court Ordered It to Revise its Tactics

The U.S. National Security Agency illegally collected up to 56,000 "wholly domestic" communications each year from 2008 to 2011. 


From ACM TechNews

Twitter Hashtags Predict Rising Tension in Egypt

Twitter Hashtags Predict Rising Tension in Egypt

The Political Polarization Index uses Twitter to measure political tension in Egypt. 


From ACM News

These Patterns Move, But It's All an Illusion

These Patterns Move, But It's All an Illusion

Focus on the ball at the center of the image. The scene appears to vibrate. If you move your head slightly forward and backward, the color fields of the rosette appear to pulsate.


From ACM TechNews

Computing Researchers Get 'schooled' on Science Policy at Lispi 2013

Computing Researchers Get 'schooled' on Science Policy at Lispi 2013

The Computing Research Association’s Computing Community Consortium recently held its second Leadership in Science Policy Institute (LiSPI) workshop.


From ACM News

Laser Listening: Could You Eavesdrop on the Guardian?

Laser Listening: Could You Eavesdrop on the Guardian?

The U.K. government has warned the Guardian newspaper that foreign agents could use laser technology to eavesdrop on them, in the wake of recent surveillance leaks.


From ACM Careers

Seven Over 70

Seven Over 70

For over a decade, we've celebrated innovators under the age of 35. We choose to write about the young because we want to introduce you to the most promising new technologists, researchers, and entrepreneurs. But I often hear…