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Communications of the ACM

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The news archive provides access to past news stories from Communications of the ACM and other sources by date.

June 2015


From ACM News

The Filter Bubble: Is It Real? Does It Matter?

The Filter Bubble: Is It Real? Does It Matter?

What are the consequences of the same searches yielding different results for different people?


From ACM News

In Search For Alien Life, Experts Reveal Cutting-Edge Science

In Search For Alien Life, Experts Reveal Cutting-Edge Science

Where can scientists find clues to help them locate and understand life beyond Earth?


From ACM News

Mind-Controlled Telepresence Robots Could Restore Mobility to the Disabled

Mind-Controlled Telepresence Robots Could Restore Mobility to the Disabled

It may not be able to do grocery shopping or hang out laundry to dry, but a project involving current telepresence technology could help people with limited mobility get around in the form of a robotic avatar.


From ACM News

Should a Driverless Car Decide Who Lives or Dies?

Should a Driverless Car Decide Who Lives or Dies?

The gearheads in Detroit, Tokyo, and Stuttgart have mostly figured out how to build driverless vehicles. Even the Google guys seem to have solved the riddle.


From ACM TechNews

Streamlined Cockroaches Inspire Highly Maneuverable Robots

Streamlined Cockroaches Inspire Highly Maneuverable Robots

University of California, Berkeley researchers are trying to emulate in robots the ability of cockroaches to roll and scoot through gaps.


From ACM TechNews

Morgan State ­niversity Professor Kevin Kornegay Is Leading New Internet of Things Initiative

Morgan State ­niversity Professor Kevin Kornegay Is Leading New Internet of Things Initiative

Research conducted at Morgan State University promises to make devices that make up the Internet of Things safer. 


From ACM TechNews

Army Computer Scientist Streamlines Network Science

Army Computer Scientist Streamlines Network Science

Researchers have developed an experimental infrastructure to dynamically create, deploy, and manage virtual clusters of heterogeneous nodes within a cloud. 


From ACM TechNews

­c Santa Cruz Team Introduces New Web-Based Tools For Finding Videogames

­c Santa Cruz Team Introduces New Web-Based Tools For Finding Videogames

GameNet and GameSage are two Web-based tools to help game players find new games suited to their individual tastes. 


From ACM Opinion

What Is the Big Secret Surrounding Stingray Surveillance?

What Is the Big Secret Surrounding Stingray Surveillance?

Given the amount of mobile phone traffic that cell phone towers transmit, it is no wonder law enforcement agencies target these devices as a rich source of data to aid their investigations.


From ACM News

How the ­.s. Finally Tracked Down a Hacker Kingpin

How the ­.s. Finally Tracked Down a Hacker Kingpin

For the U.S., the extradition of Ercan Findikoglu shows the value of patience when it comes to pursuing suspected hacker kingpins.


From ACM News

Building the Face of a Criminal from Dna

Building the Face of a Criminal from Dna

The face of a killer constructed from DNA left at the scene of a crime: it sounds like science fiction. But revealing the face of a criminal based on their genes may be closer than we think.


From ACM News

Ai's Next Frontier: Machines That ­nderstand Language

Ai's Next Frontier: Machines That ­nderstand Language

With the help of neural networks—vast networks of machines that mimic the web of neurons in the human brain—Facebook can recognize your face.


From ACM News

See-and-Tell AI Machine Can Describe Objects It Observes

See-and-Tell AI Machine Can Describe Objects It Observes

Young children can look at whatever is in front of them, and describe what they see—but for artificial intelligence systems, that's a daunting task.


From ACM TechNews

3D Vision: ­tsc Computer Scientists Develop Better Way to Visualize Molecules

3D Vision: ­tsc Computer Scientists Develop Better Way to Visualize Molecules

University of Toronto Scarborough researchers say they have developed a new way to determine the actual shapes of biological molecules such as proteins and viruses. 


From ACM TechNews

This Ancient Paper Art Makes Flexible, Super Strong Electronics

This Ancient Paper Art Makes Flexible, Super Strong Electronics

Teams of researchers  are using Kirigami, the Japanese art of paper cutting, as inspiration for developing flexible and stretchable electronics. 


From ACM TechNews

New Project Will Develop Virtual Reality Counterterror Training

New Project Will Develop Virtual Reality Counterterror Training

An innovative VR training program could help prepare security personnel in Europe to respond to physical threats and cyberattacks on critical infrastructure. 


From ACM TechNews

Programming Intelligent ­nderwater Robots

Programming Intelligent ­nderwater Robots

Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology are testing a new method of programming autonomous underwater vehicles. 


From ACM TechNews

How to Read a Digital Footprint

How to Read a Digital Footprint

Researchers think a database of psychological scores and social media data could be used to usher in a new era of psychological big data. 


From ACM News

Intriguing Geology of Ceres Revealed in New Pictures

Intriguing Geology of Ceres Revealed in New Pictures

Ceres, the largest asteroid in the Solar System, is finally getting its close-up. NASA's Dawn spacecraft arrived in March, and is now taking photographs from as close as 4,400 kilometres above the asteroid's surface.


From ACM TechNews

Automated Vehicles: One Eye on the Road, Another on You

Automated Vehicles: One Eye on the Road, Another on You

The importance of tracking motorist behavior will grow as more automated vehicles are rolled out, especially as it relates to the issue of assigning liability in accidents. 


From ACM News

A Disaster Foretold — and Ignored

A Disaster Foretold — and Ignored

LOpht's warnings about the Internet drew notice, but little action.


From ACM News

Facebook Can Recognise You in Photos Even If You're Not Looking

Facebook Can Recognise You in Photos Even If You're Not Looking

Thanks to the latest advances in computer vision, we now have machines that can pick you out of a line-up. But what if your face is hidden from view?


From ACM News

Drones Lack Autonomy

Drones Lack Autonomy

Researchers and engineers are exploring ways to help Unmanned Aerial Vehicles choose to fly themselves, and to fly more safely.


From ACM News

'epic' Fail—how Opm Hackers Tapped the Mother Lode of Espionage Data

'epic' Fail—how Opm Hackers Tapped the Mother Lode of Espionage Data

Government officials have been vague in their testimony about the data breaches—there was apparently more than one—at the Office of Personnel Management.


From ACM Opinion

Will Millimeter Waves Maximize 5g Wireless?

Will Millimeter Waves Maximize 5g Wireless?

Every decade or so since the first cellular networks appeared the companies that make mobile devices and the networks linking them have worked out new requirements defining transmission speeds, capacity and other technical characteristics…


From ACM TechNews

The Real Software Security Problem Is ­S

The Real Software Security Problem Is ­S

There are simple steps that can be taken to make software more secure and resilient, writes Carnegie Mellon University professor Jean Yang. 


From ACM TechNews

Network Model For Tracking Twitter Memes Sheds Light on Information Spreading in the Brain

Network Model For Tracking Twitter Memes Sheds Light on Information Spreading in the Brain

Indiana University researchers are working with colleagues in Switzerland to track the spread of information across the human brain. 


From ACM TechNews

Supercomputers Surprisingly Link Dna Crosses to Cancer

Supercomputers Surprisingly Link Dna Crosses to Cancer

University of Texas at Austin researchers used supercomputers to discover a surprising link between cross-shaped pieces of DNA, or cruciforms, and human cancer. 


From ACM News

Europe's First Humans: What Scientists Do and Don't Know

Europe's First Humans: What Scientists Do and Don't Know

Over the past two years, breakthroughs in ancient genomics and archaeology have revolutionized the story of the first humans in Europe—who are thought to have appeared some 45,000 years ago—and their relationship with the Neanderthals…


From ACM News

Facebook's New AI Can Paint, But Google's Knows How to Party

Facebook's New AI Can Paint, But Google's Knows How to Party

Facebook and Google are building enormous neural networks—artificial brains—that can instantly recognize faces, cars, buildings, and other objects in digital photos. But that’s not all these brains can do.