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An edited collection of advanced computing news from Communications of the ACM, ACM TechNews, other ACM resources, and news sites around the Web.


Engineers 3D-Print Soft, Rubbery Brain Implants
From ACM TechNews

Engineers 3D-Print Soft, Rubbery Brain Implants

Engineers have developed a way to three-dimensionally print neural probes and other electronic devices that are as soft and flexible as rubber.

Wearable Strain Sensor Using Light Transmittance Helps Measure Physical Signals Better
From ACM TechNews

Wearable Strain Sensor Using Light Transmittance Helps Measure Physical Signals Better

A new wearable strain sensor can complete sensitive, stable, and continuous measurements of physical signals.

Robots Use Light Beams to Zap Hospital Viruses
From ACM TechNews

Robots Use Light Beams to Zap Hospital Viruses

A robotic system uses eight UV-C ultraviolet-light-emitting bulbs to destroy bacteria, viruses, and other harmful microbes.

Soil Sifters
From ACM News

Soil Sifters

Algorithms and supercomputers help tease out how soil microbes affect global climate.

MIT Aims to Turn Wi-Fi Signals Into Usable Power With Energy-Harvesting Design
From ACM News

MIT Aims to Turn Wi-Fi Signals Into Usable Power With Energy-Harvesting Design

Device for harnessing terahertz radiation might enable self-powering implants, cellphones, other portable electronics.

A.I. Versus the Coronavirus
From ACM News

A.I. Versus the Coronavirus

A new consortium of top scientists will be able to use some of the world's most advanced supercomputers to look for solutions.

Bring in the Robot Cleaners: Travel Industry Innovations for the Pandemic
From ACM News

Bring in the Robot Cleaners: Travel Industry Innovations for the Pandemic

"Private" hotels, online tour-company teasers for future travelers, and other ways that travel companies are keeping their businesses alive.

Machine Learning, Meet Whiskey
From Communications of the ACM

Machine Learning, Meet Whiskey

Technologies are coming increasingly closer to approximating the human senses of taste and smell.
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