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An edited collection of advanced computing news from Communications of the ACM, ACM TechNews, other ACM resources, and news sites around the Web.


Computational Tool Enables Molecular Analysis of Biomedical Tissue Samples
From ACM TechNews

Computational Tool Enables Molecular Analysis of Biomedical Tissue Samples

Stanford University researchers have developed a computational tool that facilitates analysis of individual cell behavior in biomedical tissue samples.

Waymo and Lyft Partner to Scale Self-Driving Robotaxi Service in Phoenix
From ACM TechNews

Waymo and Lyft Partner to Scale Self-Driving Robotaxi Service in Phoenix

Technology developer Waymo and ride-hailing company Lyft have partnered to deploy driverless vehicles for Lyft's robotaxi service in Phoenix, AZ.

Welcome the Plants That Move on their Own
From ACM News

Welcome the Plants That Move on their Own

Exploring the potential of plant-robot hybrids that can produce architectural artifacts and living spaces.

For the First Time, Engineers Measure Accuracy of 2 Qubits in Silicon--and It Works
From ACM TechNews

For the First Time, Engineers Measure Accuracy of 2 Qubits in Silicon--and It Works

Researchers have quantified the accuracy of two-quantum-bit operations in silicon, in another step toward reliable quantum computing.

When Computer Science Majors Take Improv
From ACM TechNews

When Computer Science Majors Take Improv

Northeastern University computer science majors are required to take a class in theater and improvisation, where they practice exercises to cultivate empathy, creativity...

Robots Thrive in the Forest on Jobs Humans Find Too Boring
From ACM TechNews

Robots Thrive in the Forest on Jobs Humans Find Too Boring

Sweden's forest companies are embracing technology to cut costs and boost profits, while freeing employees from mundane tasks.

San Francisco Bans Facial Recognition Technology
From ACM TechNews

San Francisco Bans Facial Recognition Technology

San Francisco's Board of Supervisors has banned the use of facial recognition technology for surveillance purposes by police and other agencies in the city.
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