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dateMore Than a Year Ago
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An edited collection of advanced computing news from Communications of the ACM, ACM TechNews, other ACM resources, and news sites around the Web.


An App-Led Walk Down Memory Lane
From ACM TechNews

An App-Led Walk Down Memory Lane

The Memoir iPhone app accesses photos and status updates from a user's social networks based on the user's location, what is going on, and who else is around. 

Identifying Signs of Chronic Brain Injury in Living Football Players
From ACM News

Identifying Signs of Chronic Brain Injury in Living Football Players

Eight former pro football players learned this year that they have signs of a degenerative brain disorder called chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a condition...

Data Mining Reveals the Secret to Getting Good Answers
From ACM TechNews

Data Mining Reveals the Secret to Getting Good Answers

A new algorithm can rank the questions and answers on question and answer websites, while weeding out off-topic and irrelevant entries.

An Artificial Hand with Real Feelings
From ACM News

An Artificial Hand with Real Feelings

There have been remarkable mechanical advances in prosthetic limbs in recent years, including rewiring nerve fibers to control sophisticated mechanical arms (see...

Diagnosis For Healthcare.gov: ­nrealistic Technology Expectations
From ACM Opinion

Diagnosis For Healthcare.gov: ­nrealistic Technology Expectations

The fiasco with the $600 million federal health insurance website wasn't all bureaucratic.

The Online Dating Engine That Assesses Your Taste in the Opposite Sex (and Whether They Find You Attractive)
From ACM TechNews

The Online Dating Engine That Assesses Your Taste in the Opposite Sex (and Whether They Find You Attractive)

A new dating recommendation engine suggests potential dates based not only on mutual interests, but also on a person's likelihood to reply to initial contact. 

Three Questions For Computing Pioneer Carver Mead
From ACM Opinion

Three Questions For Computing Pioneer Carver Mead

Computer scientist Carver Mead gave Moore's Law its name in around 1970 and played a crucial role in making sure it's held true in the decades since.

Stores Sniff Out Smartphones to Follow Shoppers
From ACM News

Stores Sniff Out Smartphones to Follow Shoppers

You've just tossed a jar of peanut butter in your grocery cart when your smartphone buzzes.

Ads Could Soon Know If You're an Introvert (on Twitter)
From ACM News

Ads Could Soon Know If You're an Introvert (on Twitter)

Trying to derive a person's wants and needs—conscious or otherwise—from online browsing and buying habits has become crucial to companies of all kinds.

The Clever Circuit That Doubles Bandwidth
From ACM News

The Clever Circuit That Doubles Bandwidth

A startup spun out of Stanford says it has solved an age-old problem in radio communications with a new circuit and algorithm that allow data to be sent and received...

Driverless Cars Are Further Away Than You Think
From ACM Opinion

Driverless Cars Are Further Away Than You Think

A silver BMW 5 Series is weaving through traffic at roughly 120 kilometers per hour (75 mph) on a freeway that cuts northeast through Bavaria between Munich and...

Noise Pollution Maps Crowdsourced From Smartphone Data
From ACM TechNews

Noise Pollution Maps Crowdsourced From Smartphone Data

Researchers say they have developed an improved method of creating noise pollution maps that uses crowdsourced smartphone data. 

The Secrets of Online Money Laundering
From ACM News

The Secrets of Online Money Laundering

Money laundering is increasingly becoming a cybercrime.

Graphics Chips Help Process Big Data Sets in Milliseconds
From ACM News

Graphics Chips Help Process Big Data Sets in Milliseconds

New software can use the graphics processors found on everyday computers to process torrents of data more quickly than is normally possible, opening up new ways...

Tweets Have Become Shorter Since 2009, Say Computer Scientists
From ACM TechNews

Tweets Have Become Shorter Since 2009, Say Computer Scientists

Twitter users are communicating with fewer and shorter words, researchers have found.

Some Robots Are Starting to Move More Like Humans
From ACM TechNews

Some Robots Are Starting to Move More Like Humans

Roboy is a four-foot-tall humanoid robot with a set of muscles inspired by the human musculoskeletal system. 

Some Robots Are Starting to Move More Like Humans
From ACM News

Some Robots Are Starting to Move More Like Humans

Robots usually look rigid and nonhuman, with joints engineered to avoid the elasticity that can make their movements less predictable and harder to control.

In Search of the Next Boom, Developers Cram Their Apps Into Smart Watches
From ACM Careers

In Search of the Next Boom, Developers Cram Their Apps Into Smart Watches

The age of wearable computing is upon us.

Encrypted Heartbeats Keep Hackers from Medical Implants
From ACM TechNews

Encrypted Heartbeats Keep Hackers from Medical Implants

Rice University researchers have found a solution to the potential for hacking an implanted defibrillator. 

Cryptographers Have an Ethics Problem
From ACM Opinion

Cryptographers Have an Ethics Problem

Last week, I visited the MIT computer science department looking for a very famous cryptographer.
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