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Communications of the ACM

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An edited collection of advanced computing news from Communications of the ACM, ACM TechNews, other ACM resources, and news sites around the Web.


Neural Net Worth
From Communications of the ACM

Neural Net Worth

Yoshua Bengio, Geoffrey Hinton, and Yann LeCun this month will receive the 2018 ACM A.M. Turing Award for conceptual and engineering breakthroughs that have made...

Code Talkers
From Communications of the ACM

Code Talkers

Using voice input to write programs.

A New Movement in Seismology
From Communications of the ACM

A New Movement in Seismology

Unused telecom fiber might be used to detect earthquakes, uncover other secrets in the soil.

Rewarded for RISC
From Communications of the ACM

Rewarded for RISC

ACM A.M. Turing Award recipients David Patterson and John Hennessy developed the "dangerous" idea that software should be simpler so it can be executed more quickly...

Using Functions for Easier Programming
From Communications of the ACM

Using Functions for Easier Programming

Functional programming languages automate many of the details underlying specific operations.

Always Out of Balance
From Communications of the ACM

Always Out of Balance

Computational theorists prove there is no easy algorithm to find Nash equilibria, so game theory will have to look in new directions.

Going Serverless
From Communications of the ACM

Going Serverless

Serverless computing lets businesses and application developers focus on the program they need to run, without worrying about the machine on which it runs, or the...

A Block on the Old Chip
From Communications of the ACM

A Block on the Old Chip

Block copolymers may help transistors shrink to tinier dimensions.

Building a Brain May Mean Going Analog
From Communications of the ACM

Building a Brain May Mean Going Analog

Analog circuits consume less power per operation than CMOS technologies, and so should prove more efficient.

Lawmakers Seek to Expand Repair Options
From ACM News

Lawmakers Seek to Expand Repair Options

End-users want to be able to repair their expensive electronics; manufacturers disagree.

Weaving the Web
From Communications of the ACM

Weaving the Web

Sir Tim Berners-Lee created a paradigm shift that changed the world with his invention of the World Wide Web, Hypertext Transport Protocol, and Hypertext Markup...

Thinking Deeply to Make Better Speech
From Communications of the ACM

Thinking Deeply to Make Better Speech

More work is needed to make synthesized speech more natural, easier to understand, and more pleasant to hear.

Graph Matching in Theory and Practice
From Communications of the ACM

Graph Matching in Theory and Practice

A theoretical breakthrough in graph isomorphism excites complexity experts, but will it lead to any practical improvements?

The Key to Privacy
From Communications of the ACM

The Key to Privacy

40 years ago, Whitfield Diffie and Martin E. Hellman introduced the public key cryptography used to secure today's online transactions.

When Computers Stand in the Schoolhouse Door
From Communications of the ACM

When Computers Stand in the Schoolhouse Door

Classification algorithms can lead to biased decisions, so researchers are trying to identify such biases and root them out.

Seeing More Clearly
From Communications of the ACM

Seeing More Clearly

Computer understanding of images has improved rapidly, but true visual intelligence is still a long way off.

Artificial Precognition ­ses Data to See the Future
From ACM News

Artificial Precognition ­ses Data to See the Future

Using large data sets and machine learning to recognize unseen patterns.

Split Second
From Communications of the ACM

Split Second

The issue of whether to add a "leap second" to square the clock with the Earth's orbit pits time specialists against IT.

Head-Mounted Displays to Aid the Disabled
From ACM News

Head-Mounted Displays to Aid the Disabled

Products like the Oculus Rift and Google Glass could help ameliorate physical and perceptual impairments.

Forging Relationships
From Communications of the ACM

Forging Relationships

Michael Stonebraker didn't realize at the outset that it would take six years to create INGRES, one of the world's first relational databases.
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