Sign In

Communications of the ACM

News


Latest News News Archive Refine your search:
subjectPerformance And Reliability
authorArs Technica

An edited collection of advanced computing news from Communications of the ACM, ACM TechNews, other ACM resources, and news sites around the Web.


Microsoft Sheds Some Light on Its Mysterious Holographic Processing ­nit
From ACM News

Microsoft Sheds Some Light on Its Mysterious Holographic Processing ­nit

Since it was first unveiled, we've learned bits and pieces about the hardware inside Microsoft's HoloLens augmented reality headset.

Linux Turns 25, Is Bigger and More Professional Than Ever
From ACM News

Linux Turns 25, Is Bigger and More Professional Than Ever

The Linux operating system kernel is 25 years old this month. It was August 25, 1991 when Linus Torvalds posted his famous message announcing the project, claiming...

New Air-Gap Jumper Covertly Transmits Data in Hard-Drive Sounds
From ACM News

New Air-Gap Jumper Covertly Transmits Data in Hard-Drive Sounds

Researchers have devised a new way to siphon data out of an infected computer even when it has been physically disconnected from the Internet to prevent the leakage...

Transistors Will Stop Shrinking in 2021, but Moore's Law Will Live On
From ACM News

Transistors Will Stop Shrinking in 2021, but Moore's Law Will Live On

Transistors will stop shrinking after 2021, but Moore's law will probably continue, according to the final International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS)...

Tour De France to ­se Thermal Imaging to Fight Mechanical Doping
From ACM News

Tour De France to ­se Thermal Imaging to Fight Mechanical Doping

They call it "mechanical doping," but the name simply doesn't do it justice.

Do We Really Need Humans to Explore Mars?
From ACM News

Do We Really Need Humans to Explore Mars?

The dazzling sunlight that flooded the lake-front restaurant where I sat down with Chris Kraft in 2014 was nothing compared to the brightness in his eyes.

Smile, You're in the Fbi Face-Recognition Database
From ACM News

Smile, You're in the Fbi Face-Recognition Database

The Federal Bureau of Investigation has access to as many as 411.9 million images as part of its face-recognition database. 

Going Digital May Make Analog Quantum Computer Scaleable
From ACM News

Going Digital May Make Analog Quantum Computer Scaleable

There are many different schemes for making quantum computers work (most of them evil). But they pretty much all fall into two categories.

Four Wild Technologies Lawmakers Want Nasa to Pursue
From ACM News

Four Wild Technologies Lawmakers Want Nasa to Pursue

Imagine a tissue-box sized device, with blades a few feet long, whirring to life after charging for a full Sol on Mars.

Dronebuster Will Let You Point and Shoot Command Hacks at Pesky Drones
From ACM News

Dronebuster Will Let You Point and Shoot Command Hacks at Pesky Drones

Anti-drone technology has been high on the shopping list of public safety and military organizations at least since a drunken federal employee crashed a drone onto...

The Leap Second: Because Our Clocks Are More Accurate Than the Earth
From ACM News

The Leap Second: Because Our Clocks Are More Accurate Than the Earth

We've recently been treated to that extra day in February that reminds us that 2016 is a leap year.

Long After His Accident, Sam Schmidt Takes the Wheel Again Thanks to Project Sam
From ACM News

Long After His Accident, Sam Schmidt Takes the Wheel Again Thanks to Project Sam

In the late 90s, Sam Schmidt had a promising career as an IndyCar driver, finishing fifth in the championship in 1999 after taking his first win in Las Vegas.

First Came the Breathalyzer, Now Meet the Roadside Police 'textalyzer'
From ACM News

First Came the Breathalyzer, Now Meet the Roadside Police 'textalyzer'

We're all familiar with the Breathalyzer, the brand name for a roadside device that measures a suspected drunken driver's blood-alcohol level.

Nvidia ­nveils First Pascal Graphics Card, the Monstrous Tesla P100
From ACM News

Nvidia ­nveils First Pascal Graphics Card, the Monstrous Tesla P100

The first full-fat GPU based on Nvidia's all-new Pascal architecture is here.

Meet the Largest Science Project in ­S Government History—the James Webb Telescope
From ACM News

Meet the Largest Science Project in ­S Government History—the James Webb Telescope

Since Galileo first discovered the moons of Jupiter and the phases of Venus, telescopes have gotten larger, more accurate, and more powerful.

Humanoid Robots Can't Outsource Their Brains to the Cloud Due to Network Latency
From ACM TechNews

Humanoid Robots Can't Outsource Their Brains to the Cloud Due to Network Latency

Osaka University roboticist Hiroshi Ishiguro explains why offloading a humanoid robot's intelligence to a data center or a cloud computer is impractical. 

On-Chip Random Key Generation Done ­sing Carbon Nanotubes
From ACM TechNews

On-Chip Random Key Generation Done ­sing Carbon Nanotubes

A new process uses carbon nanotubes to randomly wire part of a chip, which is then used to generate cryptographic information. 

On-Chip Random Key Generation Done ­sing Carbon Nanotubes
From ACM News

On-Chip Random Key Generation Done ­sing Carbon Nanotubes

Carbon nanotubes are small and can be semiconducting, which makes lots of people excited about using them as a replacement for features etched in silicon.

Tiny, Blurry Pictures Find the Limits of Computer Image Recognition
From ACM News

Tiny, Blurry Pictures Find the Limits of Computer Image Recognition

Computers have started to get really good at visual recognition.

Gene Editing Shows Promise in Treating Muscular Dystrophy
From ACM News

Gene Editing Shows Promise in Treating Muscular Dystrophy

Duchenne muscular dystrophy is one of the most common fatal genetic diseases. It causes muscle degeneration and eventually death due to weakened heart and lung...
Sign In for Full Access
» Forgot Password? » Create an ACM Web Account