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How Safe Is Your Swipe?


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Tel Aviv University Professor Avishai Wool

"Companies need to know how secure their chip is, and how it can be cracked," says Tel Aviv University Professor Avishai Wool.

Credit: Tel Aviv University

Tel Aviv University (TAU) researchers have developed a method of extracting information from chip technology by combining modern cryptology methods with constraint programming, which could lead to important new advances in computer security.

The key weakness in modern secure chips can be found in the chip's power supply, says TAU professor Avishai Wool. The amount of power and how it fluctuates depends on the kind of information on the chip. By measuring the power fluctuations and analyzing the data, a hacker could decipher the information on the chip.

The TAU program can sort through the noise associated with hacking a computer chip to accurately analyze its contents. "Companies need to know how secure their chip is, and how it can be cracked," Wool says. "They need to know what they're up against."

From American Friends of Tel Aviv University
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Abstracts Copyright © 2010 Information Inc., Bethesda, Maryland, USA


 

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