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Wikipedia Age Challenges Scholars


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For professors, publishing in elite journals is an unavoidable part of university life. The grueling process of subjecting work to the up-or-down judgment of credentialed scholarly peers has been a cornerstone of academic culture since at least the mid-20th century.

Now some humanities scholars have begun to challenge the monopoly that peer review has on admission to scholarly journals and, as a consequence, to the charmed circle of tenured academe. They argue that in an era of digital media there is a better way to assess the quality of work. Instead of relying on a few experts selected by leading publications, they advocate using the Internet to expose scholarly thinking to the swift collective judgment of a much broader interested audience.

"What we’re experiencing now is the most important transformation in our reading and writing tools since the invention of movable type," said Katherine Rowe, a Renaissance specialist and media historian at Bryn Mawr College. "The way scholarly exchange is moving is radical, and we need to think about what it means for our fields."

From The New York Times
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