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Cyber Security Shortcomings at Nuclear Labs?


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Los Alamos National Laboratory security signs

Signs are posted on the gated wall around the main technical area of Los Alamos National Laboratory, N.M. keep visitors informed about security. The Department of Energy, which is responsible for the nation's nuclear weapons and nuclear energy, may jeopardize the security of its technology and lose millions of dollars if it does not improve its cyber security, according to a recent Inspector General's report.

Credit: Joe Raedle / Getty Images

The U.S. Department of Energy, which is responsible for the nation's nuclear weapons and nuclear energy, may jeopardize the security of its technology and lose millions of dollars if it does not improve its cyber security, according to a recent Inspector General's report.

 

Delays by the DOE's Office of Science in enhancing cyber security and standardizing its computer protocols may leave the agency's sensitive information vulnerable, and cost taxpayers upwards of $3 million. DOE has been embarrassed by security lapses in the past, like the use of unauthorized laptops at the Oak Ridge lab, and successful cyberattacks that may have orginated in China.

"Any system that is not as secure as it should be could be subject to compromise," says Rickey Hass, Deputy Inspector General for Audit Services. "There are literally thousands of people who scan systems to try to gain access."

From ABC News
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