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Inventor Demonstrates Humanoid Robot's Latest AI Abilities


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Aiko the robot

Aiko the robot will add such skills in the future as making coffee, a breakfast of bacon and eggs, giving a neck massage, writing, and cleaning windows, shelves, and bathrooms, its developer says.

Credit: Bancroft Media

Independent inventor Le Trung recently demonstrated the newest version of his robot-controlling software called Bio Robot Artificial Intelligence Neural System (BRAINS). Trung has spent the past two years developing the software for a robot, which can speak in English and Japanese, solve high school math problems, provide the weather forecast, understand more than 13,000 sentences, sing songs, identify objects, focus on objects or people of importance, read newspapers and other materials, and mimic physical human touch.

The software, which is designed to work with a robot Trung created called Aiko, can interact with the surrounding environment, process information from the environment, and record that information in its memory. Once the robot's internal memory is full, saved information can be transferred to a server database, where it could be shared with other robots.

The BRAINS software could allow Aiko to perform a variety of tasks. For example, in the home, Aiko could help the elderly by reminding them when to take their medicine, or assist children with their math homework. In a corporate or public environment, Aiko could fill positions at information desks, giving directions and instructions and informing people of what events are taking place.

In the future, Trung hopes to enable Aiko to perform tasks such as making coffee, cooking bacon and eggs, or giving a neck massage. "Future improvements include making the voice with more emotions and feelings when speaking, improving the silicone material on her face so that she can do facial expressions like humans, and redesigning the body and arm system to move more naturally and carry heavier things," Trung says.

View a video of Trung demonstrating Aiko's operating system.

From PhysOrg.com
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