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Apple Just Killed the Password—for Real This Time


A passwordless system would be a significant step forward for most people’s online security.

Credit: Boris Zhitkov/Getty Images

Your passwords are terrible. Year after year, the most popular passwords leaked in data breaches are 123456, 123456789, and 12345—'qwerty' and 'password' come close behind—and using these weak passwords leaves you vulnerable to all sorts of hacking. Weak and repeated passwords are one of the most significant risks to your online life.

For years, we've been promised a more secure, password-free future, but it seems like 2022 will actually be the year that millions of people start to move away from passwords. At Apple's Worldwide Developer Conference yesterday, the company announced it will launch passwordless logins across Macs, iPhones, iPads, and Apple TVs around September of this year. Instead of using passwords, you will be able to log in to websites and apps using "Passkeys" with iOS 16 and macOS Ventura. It's the first major real-world shift to password elimination.

So how does it work? Passkeys replace your tired old passwords by creating new digital keys using Touch ID or Face ID, Apple's vice president of internet technologies, Darin Adler, explained at WWDC. When you are creating an online account with a website, you can use a Passkey instead of a password. "To create a Passkey, just use Touch ID or Face ID to authenticate, and you're done," Adler said.

From Wired
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