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Google's New Tech Can Read Your Body Language—Without Cameras


Watching a computer that's watching you.

Said Leonardo Giusti of Google's Advanced Technology and Products division, “We believe as technology becomes more present in our life, it's fair to start asking technology itself to take a few more cues from us.”

Credit: Google

What if your computer decided not to blare out a notification jingle because it noticed you weren't sitting at your desk? What if your TV saw you leave the couch to answer the front door and paused Netflix automatically, then resumed playback when you sat back down? What if our computers took more social cues from our movements and learned to be more considerate companions?

It sounds futuristic and perhaps more than a little invasive—a computer watching your every move? But it feels less creepy once you learn that these technologies don't have to rely on a camera to see where you are and what you're doing. Instead, they use radar. Google's Advanced Technology and Products division—better known as ATAP, the department behind oddball projects such as a touch-sensitive denim jacket—has spent the past year exploring how computers can use radar to understand our needs or intentions and then react to us appropriately.

From Wired
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