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Police Are Telling ShotSpotter to Alter Evidence From Gunshot-Detecting AI


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A protest against the use of ShotSpotter in Chicago.

Among other things, a ShotSpotter analyst can manually overrode the algorithms and reclassify a sound as a gunshot.

Credit: Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

On May 31 last year, 25-year-old Safarain Herring was shot in the head and dropped off at St. Bernard Hospital in Chicago by a man named Michael Williams. He died two days later. 

Chicago police eventually arrested the 64-year-old Williams and charged him with murder (Williams maintains that Herring was hit in a drive-by shooting). A key piece of evidence in the case is video surveillance footage showing Williams' car stopped on the 6300 block of South Stony Island Avenue at 11:46 p.m.—the time and location where police say they know Herring was shot.

How did they know that's where the shooting happened? Police said ShotSpotter, a surveillance system that uses hidden microphone sensors to detect the sound and location of gunshots, generated an alert for that time and place.

Except that's not entirely true, according to recent court filings.

From Vice
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