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A Blueprint for Designing, Synthesizing Multifunctional Materials


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A simulation of a nanocrystal (left) next to the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image of what was created in the lab.

Bringing together theory, computational simulations, chemical synthesis, and assembly, researchers from the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Michigan have demonstrated how an inverse design strategy can create unique materials from nanocrystals of varying compositions, sizes, and shapes.

Credit: Katherine Elbert

Nanocrystal combinations can yield new multifunctional materials through an inverse design blueprint.

Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania (UPenn) and the University of Michigan developed the template by combining theory, computational simulations, chemical synthesis, and assembly.

UPenn's Katherine Elbert said the research intends to surmount the tendency for differently-sized and -shaped nanocrystals to cohere heterogeneously.

The researchers applied a library of laboratory-synthesized nanocrystals and simulations to refine the nanocrystal coating in order to induce ordered solids rather than heterogeneous aggregates.

By following specialized lab methods, the researchers formed a mixed and stable film from two distinct infrared active nanocrystals, highlighting the unexpected value of surface molecule modifications in triggering nanocrystal assemblies.

From Penn Today, University of Pennsylvania
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Abstracts Copyright © 2021 SmithBucklin, Washington, DC, USA


 

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