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Why Apple and Google's Virus Alert Apps Had Limited Success


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Trying to perform COVID-19 contact tracing.

Some researchers say Apple and Google's product and policy choices limited their contact tracing systems usefulness, raising questions about the power of Big Tech to set global standards for public health tools.

Credit: Guillem Casasus

Sarah Cavey, a real estate agent in Denver, was thrilled last fall when Colorado introduced an app to warn people of possible coronavirus exposures.

Based on software from Apple and Google, the state's smartphone app uses Bluetooth signals to detect users who come into close contact. If a user later tests positive, the person can anonymously notify other app users whom the person may have crossed paths with in restaurants, on trains or elsewhere.

Ms. Cavey immediately downloaded the app. But after testing positive for the virus in February, she was unable to get the special verification code she needed from the state to warn others, she said, even after calling Colorado's health department three times.

"They advertise this app to make people feel good," Ms. Cavey said, adding that she had since deleted the app, called CO Exposure Notifications, in frustration. "But it's not really doing anything."

From The New York Times
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