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Researchers Advance 3D Printing to Aid Tissue Replacement


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A three-dimensionally-printed scaffold of a nose.

Researchers at Washington State University, the University of Texas-San Antonio, Morehouse College, and the University of Rochester have developed a unique scaffolding material for engineered tissues that can be altered to grow natural tissue.

Credit: Washington State University

A unique scaffolding material for engineered tissues developed by researchers at Washington State University (WSU), the University of Texas-San Antonio, Morehouse College, and the University of Rochester can be altered to grow natural tissue.

Three-dimensional (3D) printing of biological structures involve the layer-by-layer depositing of "bioinks" to create "scaffolds" that provide a suitable place for cells to grow.

WSU's Arda Gozen said, "The success of this method in manufacturing functional tissues relies heavily on how well the fabricated structures mimic the native tissues."

The researchers created a new bioink material featuring such ingredients as gelatin, gum arabic, and sodium alginate. Three chemical processes were used to merge the ingredients into a single scaffold material for printing.

The material's mechanical properties can be altered by adjusting the chemical processes to make a final scaffold that is softer or stiffer, eliminating the need to change the scaffold design.

From Washington State University
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