Sign In

Communications of the ACM

ACM TechNews

Study Shows Powered Prosthetic Ankles Can Restore a Wide Range of Functions for Amputees


View as: Print Mobile App Share: Send by email Share on reddit Share on StumbleUpon Share on Hacker News Share on Tweeter Share on Facebook
A study participant performing a squatting activity with different prosthetic devices.

A recent case study from North Carolina State University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill demonstrates that, with training, neural control of a powered prosthetic ankle can restore a wide range of abilities.

Credit: Aaron Fleming

A case study by researchers at North Carolina State University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill showed that a prosthetic ankle powered by neural control technologies could help amputees regain a wide range of abilities with training.

Researcher Helen Huang said, "This case study shows that it is possible to use these neural control technologies, in which devices respond to electrical signals from a patient's muscles, to help patients using robotic prosthetic ankles move more naturally and intuitively."

The case study focused on activities that are challenging with typical prostheses, like squatting. The powered prosthesis responded to electrical signals from two residual calf muscles that control ankle motion. Researcher Aaron Fleming said, "It is much more similar to the way people move intuitively, and that can make a big difference in how people respond to using a prosthesis at all."

From NC State University News
View Full Article

 

Abstracts Copyright © 2021 SmithBucklin, Washington, DC, USA


 

No entries found