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A Molecule That Responds to Light


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A Europium(III) molecule.

Researchers at Germany's Karlsruhe Institute of Technology and Chimie ParisTech/CNRS have advanced the development of molecule-based materials suitable for use as light-addressable fundamental qbits.

Credit: S._Kuppusamy/Karlsruhe Institute of Technology

Researchers at Germany's Karlsruhe Institute of Technology and French chemical research center Chimie ParisTech/CNRS have advanced the development of molecule-based materials that can serve as light-addressable fundamental quantum bits (qubits).

A nuclear-spin-containing dimeric europium(III) molecule exhibits luminescence when excited by ultraviolet light-absorbing ligands surrounding the europium(III) center, which then transfer light energy to the center.

Light is emitted when the excited center relaxes to the ground state, a process known as sensitized luminescence.

Laser-driven spectral hole burning detects the polarization of the nuclear spin levels, signaling the generation of an efficient light-nuclear spin interface that can produce light-addressable hyperfine qubits.

Chimie ParisTech/CRNS' Philippe Goldner said, "By demonstrating for the first time light-induced spin polarization in the europium(III) molecule, we have succeeded in taking a promising step towards the development of quantum computing architectures based on rare-earth ion-containing molecules."

From Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Germany)
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Abstracts Copyright © 2021 SmithBucklin, Washington, DC, USA


 

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