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Communications of the ACM

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Optical Fiber Could Boost Power of Superconducting Quantum Computers


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A quantum computer's cryostat.

Physicists at the U.S. National Institute of Science and Technology physicists measured and controlled a superconducting quantum bit using light-conducting fiber (arrow), instead of metal electrical cables.

Credit: F. Lecocq/NIST

Physicists at the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) measured and controlled a superconducting quantum bit (qubit) with optical fiber.

The researchers integrated the fiber with standard components that convert, carry, and quantify light at the photonic level, which could then be easily converted into microwaves.

The NIST team used the photonic link to produce microwave pulses that either measured or controlled the quantum state of the qubit, by transmitting signals to the qubit at its natural resonance frequency.

The qubit oscillated between its ground and excited states when adequate laser power was applied, and the cavity frequency accurately reflected the qubit's state 98% of the time, which equaled the accuracy acquired via coaxial cable.

From U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology
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Abstracts Copyright © 2021 SmithBucklin, Washington, DC, USA


 

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