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Scientists Digitally Rebuilt Dinosaur's Brain, Made Some Surprising Discoveries


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hecodontosaurus was the size of a large dog and lived in the Triassic age.

A dinosaur's brain reconstructed by researchers at the U.K.'s University of Bristol suggests the sauropod may have been bipedal and occasionally carnivorous.

Credit: De Agostini/Getty Images

A dinosaur's brain reconstructed through advanced imaging and three-dimensional modeling by researchers at the U.K.'s University of Bristol suggests the sauropod may have been bipedal and occasionally carnivorous, unlike later relatives.

The software used to three-dimensionally model the brain and inner ear configuration of Thecodontosaurus from computer tomography scans of its braincase fossil revealed large floccular lobes, indicating bipedalism and agility.

Bristol's Antonio Ballell said, "Our analysis showed parts of the brain associated with keeping the head stable and eyes and gaze steady during movement were well-developed. This could also mean Thecodontosaurus could occasionally catch prey."


From: CNN
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Abstracts Copyright © 2020 SmithBucklin, Washington, DC, USA


 

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