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Russian Hackers Broke Into Federal Agencies, U.S. Officials Suspect


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The U.S. Treasury was one of the agencies targeted by hackers.

The Trump administration acknowledged Sunday that hackers acting on behalf of a foreign government broke into a range of key government networks, including in the Treasury and Commerce departments, and had free access to their email systems.

Credit: Patrick Semansky/Associated Press

The Trump administration acknowledged on Sunday that hackers acting on behalf of a foreign government — almost certainly a Russian intelligence agency, according to federal and private experts — broke into a range of key government networks, including in the Treasury and Commerce Departments, and had free access to their email systems.

Officials said a hunt was on to determine if other parts of the government had been affected by what looked to be one of the most sophisticated, and perhaps among the largest, attacks on federal systems in the past five years. Several said national security-related agencies were also targeted, though it was not clear whether the systems contained highly classified material.

The Trump administration said little in public about the hack, which suggested that while the government was worried about Russian intervention in the 2020 election, key agencies working for the administration — and unrelated to the election — were actually the subject of a sophisticated attack that they were unaware of until recent weeks.

"The United States government is aware of these reports, and we are taking all necessary steps to identify and remedy any possible issues related to this situation," John Ullyot, a spokesman for the National Security Council, said in a statement. The Department of Homeland Security's cybersecurity agency, whose leader was fired by President Trump last month for declaring that there had been no widespread election fraud, said in a statement that it had been called in as well.

 

From The New York Times
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