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Sensor for Smart Textiles Survives Washing Machine, Cars, Hammers


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The strain sensor.

This ultra-sensitive resilient strain sensor can be embedded in textiles and soft robotic systems.

Credit: Oluwaseun Araromi/Harvard SEAS

Researchers from the Harvard University John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering have developed a strain sensor for use in smart textiles and soft robotic systems that is extremely resilient.

SEAS' Oluwaseun Araromi said the sensor was inspired by the Slinky toy, and uses conductive carbon fibers patterned in a serpentine meander for stretchability.

The sensor has survived being stabbed with a scalpel, hit with a hammer, run over by a car, and multiple washing machine cycles, and emerged unscathed.

SEAS' Conor Walsh said the integration of the device within apparel "will enable exciting new applications by being able to make biomechanical and physiological measurements throughout a person's day, not possible with current approaches."

From Harvard University John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
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Abstracts Copyright © 2020 SmithBucklin, Washington, DC, USA


 

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