Sign In

Communications of the ACM

ACM TechNews

Automated Mobility District 'Digital Twin' Provides Insights for Urban Transportation Systems


View as: Print Mobile App Share: Send by email Share on reddit Share on StumbleUpon Share on Hacker News Share on Tweeter Share on Facebook
A shared automated vehicle on its route.

U.S. Department of Energy National Renewable Energy Laboratory researchers have developed the Automated Mobility District toolkit to help researchers and city planners determine the extent of specific advantages and disadvantages in their urban transportation systems.

Credit: Dennis Schroeder/NREL

At the U.S. Department of Energy-funded National Renewable Energy Laboratory, researchers have developed a modeling and simulation toolkit to help researchers and city planners determine the extent of specific advantages and disadvantages of urban transportation systems.

The Automated Mobility District (AMD) toolkit delivers a mathematical model of emerging mobility in select urban districts, a digital twin that permits an analysis of how those systems impact mobility and energy.

The toolkit initially was used to quantify the impact of low-speed shared automated vehicles (SAVs) in geofenced districts at Clemson University's International Center for Automotive Research in Greenville, SC.

AMD analysis determined that adding electrified SAVs to provide shared mobility services would boost fuel savings from 11% to 38% by satisfying regional travel demand.

From National Renewable Energy Laboratory
View Full Article

 

Abstracts Copyright © 2020 SmithBucklin, Washington, DC, USA


 

No entries found