Sign In

Communications of the ACM

ACM TechNews

How AI Systems Use Mad Libs to Teach Themselves Grammar


View as: Print Mobile App Share: Send by email Share on reddit Share on StumbleUpon Share on Hacker News Share on Tweeter Share on Facebook
A sample of Mad Libs.

Researchers at Stanford University have found that advanced AI systems can work out linguistic principles like grammar by themselves, by essentially playing billions of fill-in-the-blank games similar to Mad Libs.

Credit: Brain Bunny

Artificial intelligence (AI) researchers at Stanford University have found that advanced AI systems can work out linguistic principles like grammar by themselves, by essentially playing billions of fill-in-the-blank games similar to Mad Libs.

The systems gradually produce their own models of word interrelationships, becoming increasingly better at predicting missing words.

In one study, researchers used Google's BERT (Bidirectional Encoder Representations from Transformers) language-processing model, and observed that it was learning sentence structure to identify nouns and verbs as well as subjects, objects, and predicates.

This enhanced its ability to extract the true meaning of sentences that might otherwise be confusing. A second study using BERT found that the model apparently could infer universal grammatical relationships that apply to many different languages, which should make it easier for systems that learn one language to learn more, even if they appear to have few commonalities.

From Stanford Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence
View Full Article

 

Abstracts Copyright © 2020 SmithBucklin, Washington, DC, USA


 

No entries found