Sign In

Communications of the ACM

ACM TechNews

Supercomputing Future Wind Power Rise


View as: Print Mobile App Share: Send by email Share on reddit Share on StumbleUpon Share on Hacker News Share on Tweeter Share on Facebook
A wind farm.

Cornell University researchers used supercomputers to project scenarios for expanding installed U.S. wind power capacity.

Credit: Pexels

Cornell University researchers employed supercomputers to project scenarios for expanding installed U.S. wind power capacity from 7% of the nation's electricity supply today to a goal of 20% by 2030.

The researchers considered plans for expanding capacity without using additional land, and determined that the U.S. could double or even quadruple its wind power capacity with little change to system-wide efficiency, and with little impact on local climate—partly through next-generation turbine deployment.

The team ran simulations by applying the National Center for Atmospheric Research's Weather Research Forecasting (WRF) model over the eastern U.S., using the Cori supercomputer at the Department of Energy's National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center.

Said Cornell’s Sara C. Pryor, “Our work is designed to inform the expansion of this industry and ensure it's done in a way that maximizes the energy output from wind and thus continues the trend towards lower cost of energy from wind.”

From Texas Advanced Computing Center
View Full Article

 

Abstracts Copyright © 2020 SmithBucklin, Washington, DC, USA


 

No entries found