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Molecule Co-Discovered at University of Limerick Leads to Breakthrough on How Data is Stored


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University of Limerick researcher Damien Thompson.

Researchers at the University of Limerick in Ireland, the National University of Singapore, the Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, and Texas A&M University have discovered a metal-organic molecule that can switch between three distinct, long-lived states.

Credit: University of Limerick

Researchers at the University of Limerick (UL) in Ireland, the National University of Singapore, the Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science (IACS), and Texas A&M University have discovered a metal-organic molecule that can switch between three distinct, long-lived states.

The ternary "molecular traffic light" device could provide a low-energy way of storing and processing unstructured big data required for the Internet of Things and artificial intelligence.

The stable third state is made possible by an unequal sharing of electrons between different sides of the molecule.

Said UL researcher Damien Thompson, "In this new material, ions pulse back and forth between different binding sites on the molecules, which opens up the third state, making it energetically accessible and technologically exploitable."

From University of Limerick
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Abstracts Copyright © 2020 SmithBucklin, Washington, DC, USA


 

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