Sign In

Communications of the ACM

ACM TechNews

Hackers Can Clone Millions of Toyota, Hyundai, Kia Keys


View as: Print Mobile App Share: Send by email Share on reddit Share on StumbleUpon Share on Hacker News Share on Tweeter Share on Facebook
A Toyota wireless key fob.

Researchers at Katholieke Universiteit Leuven in Belgium and the University of Birmingham in the U.K. found new vulnerabilities in encryption systems used by in-vehicle devices that communicate at close range with key fobs.

Credit: Toyota

Researchers at Katholieke Universiteit Leuven in Belgium and the University of Birmingham in the U.K. found new vulnerabilities in encryption systems used by in-vehicle devices that communicate at close range with key fobs to unlock the car's ignition.

Millions of Toyota, Hyundai, and Kia vehicles use Texas Instruments' DST80 encryption, which bases cryptographic keys on cars' serial numbers.

A hacker who swipes a Proxmark radio-frequency identification reader/transmitter near the fob of an auto equipped with DST80 can obtain sufficient data to acquire its secret cryptographic value, impersonate the key within the car, and start the engine.

The researchers said this cloning exploit is more difficult than "relay" attacks that car thieves typically use, but hackers can use the compromised information to repeatedly drive the targeted auto.

From Wired
View Full Article

 

Abstracts Copyright © 2020 SmithBucklin, Washington, DC, USA


 

No entries found