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AAA Warns Pedestrian Detection Systems Don't Work When Needed Most


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The research found automatic emergency braking systems with pedestrian detection perform inconsistently, and proved to be completely ineffective at night.

New research from AAA found that automatic emergency braking systems with pedestrian detection perform inconsistently, and proved to be completely ineffective at night.

Credit: AAA

New research from AAA reveals that automatic emergency braking systems with pedestrian detection perform inconsistently, and proved to be completely ineffective at night. An alarming result, considering 75% of pedestrian fatalities occur after dark. The systems were also challenged by real-world situations, like a vehicle turning right into the path of an adult. AAA's testing found that in this simulated scenario, the systems did not react at all, colliding with the adult pedestrian target every time. For the safety of everyone on the road, AAA supports the continued development of pedestrian detection systems, specifically when it comes to improving functionality at night and in circumstances where drivers are most likely to encounter pedestrians.

On average, nearly 6,000 pedestrians lose their lives each year, accounting for 16% of all traffic deaths, a percentage that has steadily grown since 2010.

"Pedestrian fatalities are on the rise, proving how important the safety impact of these systems could be when further developed," said Greg Brannon, AAA's director of Automotive Engineering and Industry Relations. "But, our research found that current systems are far from perfect and still require an engaged driver behind the wheel."

While time of day and location are contributing factors to pedestrian fatalities, vehicle speed also plays a major role. Previous research from the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety found that pedestrians are at greater risk for severe injury or death the faster a car is traveling at the time of impact. For example, a pedestrian hit by a vehicle traveling at 20 mph has an 18% risk of severe injury or death. Increase that by just 10 mph to 30 mph and the risk more than doubles to 47%. AAA's latest study found that speed impacted system performance as well, with results varying between testing performed at 20 mph and 30 mph.

 

From AAA Newsroom
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