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The Next Hot Job: Pretending to Be a Robot


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Humans are the drivers of many robotic systems.

Most industrial robotic systems are not fully autonomous and require, at the very least, humans monitoring them from afar.

Credit: Daniel Hertzberg

Across industries, engineers are developing robotic systems to accomplish a range of tasks, including terrestrial delivery robots, flying delivery drones, office-patrolling security robots, inventory-checking robots, or remotely piloted vehicles.

However, most of the robotic systems are not fully autonomous and require, at the very least, humans monitoring them from afar.

Whether the humans in charge of these robotic system are in the same city or thousands of miles away, the development of not-yet-autonomous technologies is driving a small but rapidly growing workforce.

Nearly all companies using "autonomous" robots have to depend on the 1-to-N ratio, where N is the number of robots a single human can handle.

While humans might be more capable than artificial intelligence right now, these robotic systems can still be dangerous if handled incorrectly.

From The Wall Street Journal
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Abstracts Copyright © 2019 SmithBucklin, Washington, DC, USA


 

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