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What Do Dating Technology and Alzheimer's Have in Common?


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Amyloid plaques and blood vessel abnormalities in postmortem brains of Alzheimer's patients.

Researchers at the Universities of California at Davis and San Francisco have developed a method of teaching a computer to recognize an indicator of Alzheimer's disease in human brain tissue.

Credit: Keiser/Dugger Labs

Researchers at the Universities of California at Davis (UC Davis) and San Francisco have developed a method of teaching a computer to detect an indicator of Alzheimer's disease in human brain tissue.

Like a computer dating service that allows users to label someone's photo “hot” or “not,” the researchers developed a Web platform that allows neuropathologists to observe enlarged images of brain regions where plaques are potentially located, and quickly label what they see.

This tool, which the researchers called “blob or not,” allowed one researcher to annotate plaque candidates at a rate of about 2,000 images per hour.

Said Brittany N. Dugger of UC Davis, “As keyboards have aided in writing workflows, digital pathology paired with machine learning can aid with neuropathology workflows.”

From University of California
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Abstracts Copyright © 2019 SmithBucklin, Washington, DC, USA


 

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