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Article 13 Threatens Videogame Streamers in the EU: Survey


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A streaming videogamer.

Nearly half of surveyed gamers who stream video of themselves playing videogames say the legal implications of Article 13 would dissuade them from streaming gameplay.

Credit: securitygladiators.com

Nearly half of surveyed gamers who stream video of themselves playing videogames on Twitch, YouTube, and other video sites say the legal implications of Article 13 would dissuade them from streaming gameplay.

The survey questioned 1,500 videogame streamers in the U.K. about how they would respond to Article 13 of the recently passed EU Copyright Directive, which mandates content filtering of copyrighted material before it is posted online.

Videogame content belongs to the developer and publisher of the game, so streamers and the platforms they use, such as Twitch and YouTube, could potentially be held liable for copyright violations under Article 13 by streaming or uploading gameplay videos without permission.

Key highlights of the survey:

  • 45.6% of streamers would be dissuaded from streaming gameplay if they could be held liable for copyright violations.
  • 44.8% of respondents would switch to a different streaming platform if their current one prohibited viewers from Europe and the alternative did not.
  • Only 36.6% said they would continue streaming/uploading if European viewers were barred from watching, while 30.7% replied "I don't know."
  • Respondents who identified as female were more likely to quit streaming if European viewers were barred from watching (37.87% vs. 26.59%).
  • Older streamers were more likely than younger streamers to be dissuaded from streaming gameplay if they could be held liable for copyright violations.

From Comparitech
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