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Home Robot Control for People With Disabilities


Henry Evans used a PR2 robot to shave, wipe his face, and scratch his head.

Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have developed an augmented reality interface to help disabled individuals control complex assistive robots using a single-button mouse.

Credit: Henry Clever and Phillip Grice/Georgia Institute of Technoloty

Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) researchers have developed an augmented reality (AR) interface to help disabled individuals control complex assistive robots using a single-button mouse.

A paralyzed man incapable of speech uses the interface to operate a two-armed PR2 mobile manipulator via an eye-tracking mouse.

The Georgia Tech researchers said, "Our approach is to provide an [AR] interface running in a standard Web browser with only low-level robot autonomy," which uses "state-of-the-art visualization to present the robot's sensor information and options for controlling the robot in a way that people with profound motor deficits have found easy to use."

The robot can only manage low-level tasks, like tactile-sensor-driven grasping, and moving an arm to execute end-effector poses.

The interface offered consistent performance across a range of situations, so the operator could use the robot in different ways.

From IEEE Spectrum
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Abstracts Copyright © 2019 SmithBucklin, Washington, DC, USA


 

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