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Researchers Develop Method to Improve 3D-Printed Prosthetics by Integrating Electronic Sensors


Josie Fraticelli examines a powered prosthetic made for her.

Researchers at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University have integrated electronic sensors with personalized three-dimensionally-printed prosthetics.

Credit: Logan Wallace

Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech) researchers have integrated electronic sensors with personalized three-dimensionally- (3D)-printed prosthetics, which could eventually make electric-powered prosthetics more affordable.

By combining the sensors at the interface between the prosthetic and the wearer's tissue, the researchers can collect information about function and comfort, to help enhance future models.

The team utilized 3D scanning data to guide the integration of sensors into the prosthetic's form-fitting cavity, using a conformal 3D printing method.

Virginia Tech's Yuxin Tong said the project aims to foster engineering practices and processes that can reach as many people as possible.

Said Virginia Tech's Blake Johnson, "Personalizing and modifying the properties and functionalities of wearable system interfaces using 3D scanning and 3D printing opens the door to the design and manufacture of new technologies for human assistance and healthcare."

From Virginia Tech News
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Abstracts Copyright © 2019 SmithBucklin, Washington, DC, USA


 

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