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States Are Adopting More Computer Science Policies. Are High Schools Keeping Up?


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Comparing underrepresented minority students and schools teaching computer science.

Although U.S. states are increasingly implementing computer science policies, individual high schools appear to be struggling with actual instruction, according to a report developed by Code.org with the assistance of the Computer Science Teachers Association.

Credit: Code.org

U.S. states are increasingly implementing computer science policies, but individual high schools are struggling with actual instruction, according to the nonprofit Code.org.

Over the past five years, the number of states with one or more computer science education policies has jumped from 14 to 44, according to a Code.org report, written in conjunction with the Computer Science Teachers Association (CSTA).

Code.org's Pat Yongpradit says two of the remaining states, Missouri and South Dakota, are expected to pass computer science legislation "any day now."

Despite this legislative progress, only 35% of high schools evaluated offer computer science classes, in a finding that CSTA's Jake Baskin describes as "shocking."

Among the schools less likely to offer computer science are those with higher percentages of black and Latinx students, students receiving free and reduced-cost lunch, and students from rural areas.

Since last year, 33 states have enacted legislation to boost access to computer science education.

From EdSurge (CA)
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