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Decoding the Pipeline for Tech's 'Hidden Figures'


A National Science Foundation breakdown of bachelor degree completions in computer science.

A data brief from the Kapor Center and the Center for Gender Equity in Science and Technology at Arizona State University observes that while women of color are a growing population in the U.S., they remain significantly underrepresented in the technology pipeline.

Credit: National Science Foundation

In collaboration with the Kapor Center, the Center for Gender Equity in Science and Technology (CGEST) at Arizona State University is working to acknowledge and understand what is known as the "double-bind" for women of color in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields.

A new data brief from the two organizations highlights that while women of color are a growing population in the U.S., they remain significantly underrepresented across the technology pipeline. For example, less than 7% of students taking Advanced Placement computer science classes in the U.S. are girls of color.

In addition, women of color comprise less than 10% of those earning bachelor's degrees in computing, and less than 2% of the Silicon Valley technology workforce.

The Kapor Center’s Allison Scott said, “We hope to call attention to the importance of understanding intersectionality and the unique experiences of women of color. At the same time, we want to develop and share strategies to increase the participation and success of women of color across the computing pipeline.”

From ASU Now
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