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Study Finds Daily Cycles in Our Thinking Patterns


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The research indicates the possible influence of circadian rhythms on thinking.

University of Bristol researchers analyzing 7 billion words used in 800 million tweets found that a person's mode of thinking changes at different times of the day.

Credit: University of Bristol News

Researchers at the University of Bristol in the U.K. have discovered that a person's mode of thinking changes at different times of the day and follows a 24-hour pattern.

The team studied human thinking behavior by analyzing 7 billion words used in 800 million tweets. Using artificial intelligence (AI), the team analyzed aggregated and anonymized U.K. Twitter content sampled every hour over the course of four years across 54 of the U.K.'s largest cities to gauge whether thinking modes change collectively.

Tracking the use of specific words associated with 73 psychometric indicators, the team identified language variations that show different emotional and cognitive modalities in human thoughts.

The researchers found analytical thinking peaks in the morning, giving way to a more emotional and existential style in the evening and night. These changes coincide with major changes in neural activity and hormonal levels, suggesting a possible link to circadian rhythms.

From University of Bristol News
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