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How Even One Connected Vehicle Can Improve Safety, Save Energy


Long-exposure image of traffic in downtown Ann Arbor, MI.

University of Michigan researchers have found that even one automated vehicle using connected cruise control among human-driven cars increases safety and reduces energy use.

Credit: Marcin Szczepanski/Michigan Engineering

University of Michigan researchers have found that even one automated vehicle using connected cruise control among human-driven cars increases safety and reduces energy use.

Connected cruise control can adjust a vehicle's speed using data from vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communication. An automated vehicle with connected cruise control uses 60% less G-force in braking than that required by a car with a human driver, boosting energy efficiency by as much as 19%, the researchers found.

In experiments, some people hit the brakes heavily and decelerated at up to 0.8 G, causing anything in the vehicle not buckled down to fly forward. In comparison, the V2V-based automated driving algorithm did not spill a drop of coffee while keeping its decelerations to less than 0.3 G.

The work also found that human-driven, non-automated cars following a V2V-equipped vehicle can achieve a reduction in energy use, as they experience a smoother speed profile.

From University of Michigan News
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