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No Evidence to Support Link Between Violent Video Games and Behavior


Some video gamers mid-game.

Experiments at the University of York in the U.K have demonstrated that video game concepts do not "prime" players to behave in certain ways, and that increasing the realism of violent video games does not necessarily boost aggression in gamers.

Credit: Debate.org

Researchers at the University of York in the U.K. have conducted experiments involving more than 3,000 participants, demonstrating that video game concepts do not "prime" players to behave in certain ways and that increasing the realism of violent video games does not necessarily boost aggression in gamers.

Previous studies on the priming effect provided mixed conclusions; the University of York researchers expanded the number of participants and compared different types of gaming realism.

In one study, participants played a game where they had to either be a car avoiding collisions with a truck, or a mouse avoiding a cat. Following the game, the players were shown various images and asked to label them as either a vehicle or an animal.

"We found that the priming of violent concepts, as measured by how many violent concepts appeared in the word fragment completion task, was not detectable," says the University of York's David Zendle.

From University of York
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