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Anticipating Aftershocks


Time-independent robabilities that certain locations in California will experience one or more magnitude 6.7 or greater earthquakes during a 30-year interval.

Researchers at the U.S. Geological Survey and the Southern California Earthquake Center used computations performed on the original Stampede supercomputer at the Texas Advanced Computing Center, the University of Southern California's Center for High-Perf

Credit: Texas Advanced Computing Center

Researchers at the U.S. Geological Survey and the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) in June released a major report summarizing the scientific and hazard results of the Uniform California Earthquake Rupture Forecast (UCERF3).

The results relied on computations performed on the original Stampede supercomputer at the Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC), the University of Southern California's Center for High-Performance Computing, and the Stampede2 supercomputer.

"High-performance computing on TACC's Stampede system, and during the early user period of Stampede2, allowed us to create what is, by all measures, the most advanced earthquake forecast in the world," says SCEC director Thomas H. Jordan.

The researchers developed the model by running 250,000 rupture scenarios of California, significantly more than the previous model, which simulated only 8,000 ruptures. The UCERF3 model also helps predict the associated costs of earthquakes in the region, and is adaptable to many other continental fault systems.

From Texas Advanced Computing Center
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Abstracts Copyright © 2017 Information Inc., Bethesda, Maryland, USA


 

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