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ACM TechNews

Brain-Controlled Drones Are Here


skullcap with electrodes

An ASU student wears a skull cap outfitted with 128 electrodes wired to a computer.

Credit: Vimeo

Panos Artemiadis at Arizona State University's Human-Oriented Robotics and Control Lab says the next three to five years will likely see the advent of unmanned vehicle swarms controlled by human-brain interfaces. Artemiadis expects people will work with such swarms for search-and-rescue missions, as the neural-machine interface will facilitate simultaneous control of multiple drones while scaling the ability of a robot team to cover larger areas in less time. Artemiadis also sees fire-fighting as another use case for thought-controlled drone swarms, enabling real-time fire monitoring.

Agricultural surveillance by drones will yield maps for soil analysis and irrigation planning, while the potential for enhancing entertainment events via drone tracking also is a possibility.

Artemiadis says a greater understanding of brain-drone interfaces will lead to the development of cyber-physical surveillance systems that integrate human intuition and experience with the sensing abilities of multiple drones, yielding even more efficient and precise monitoring systems.

From Arizona State University
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