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PupilScreen Aims to Allow Parents, Coaches, Medics to Detect Concussion, Brain Injuries With a Smartphone


A snapshot on a smartphone can detect a concussion.

Researchers at the University of Washington are developing a smartphone application that can detect concussions and other traumatic brain injuries.

Credit: Dennis Wise/University of Washington

Researchers at the University of Washington are developing PupilScreen, a smartphone application that can objectively detect concussions and other traumatic brain injuries.

The app uses a smartphone's video camera and deep-learning tools to detect changes in a pupil's response to light. The pupillary light reflex has traditionally been used to assess whether a patient has severe traumatic brain injury, and recent research shows it can be useful in detecting milder concussions.

The researchers have showed PupilScreen can be used to detect instances of significant traumatic brain injury, and a broader clinical study this fall will enable coaches, emergency medical technicians, doctors, and others to test the system and gather more data on which pupillary response characteristics are most helpful in identifying concussions.

PupilScreen uses deep-learning algorithms that can determine which video pixels belong to the pupil in each video frame and measure the changes in pupil size across those frames.

From UW News (WA)
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