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Print No Evil: Three-Layer Technique Helps Secure Additive Manufacturing


Raheem Beyah, Motorola Foundation Professor and associate chair of the Georgia Institute of Technologys School of Electrical and Computer Engineering.

Researchers from the Georgia Institute of Technology and Rutgers University have developed a three-layer system to verify that components produced using additive manufacturing have not been compromised.

Credit: Christopher Moore/Georgia Tech

Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) and Rutgers University have developed a three-layer system for validating that components produced via additive manufacturing have not been compromised.

The system measures acoustics in a three-dimensional (3D) printer as it runs using an inexpensive microphone and filtering software, detecting changes in the printer's sound that may signal malware installation.

The second security layer includes sensors that detect variations in the expected mechanical pathway of the extruder and other printer elements.

The third layer consists of Raman Spectroscopy and computed tomography to determine whether the locations of gold nanorods incorporated into the filament material diverge from their expected whereabouts.

The method was assessed on three types of 3D printers and a computer numerical control machine. In addition to spotting malicious activity or quality problems, the technique could halt inadvertent production problems, reducing materials waste.

Georgia Tech professor Raheem Beyah says the research could initially be applied to implants and medical devices.

From Georgia Tech News Center
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