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New Prospects for Universal Memory


Stages of chemical reactions involved in the deposition of oxygen-deficient tantalum oxide films.

Researchers in MIPT’s Center of Shared Research Facilities have found a way to control oxygen concentration in tantalum oxide films produced by atomic layer deposition.

Credit: MIPT News Russia

Researchers at MIPT's Center of Shared Research Facilities in Russia have found a way to control the oxygen concentration in tantalum oxide films produced by atomic layer deposition, a breakthrough they say could be the basis for creating new forms of nonvolatile memory.

In an attempt to find an alternative to resistive switching memory (ReRAM), which is not applicable to functional three-dimensional architectures, the MIPT researchers turned to atomic layer deposition (ALD), a chemical process by which thin films can be produced on the surface of a material.

"The hardest part in depositing oxygen-deficient films was finding the right reactants that would make it possible to both eliminate the ligands contained in the metallic precursor and control oxygen content in the resulting coating," says MIPT researcher Andrey Markeev.

The researchers achieved this by using a tantalum precursor, which by itself contains oxygen, and a reactant in the form of plasma-activated hydrogen.

From MIPT News (Russia)
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